Sunday Summary day for all you might’ve missed this week. I’m writing to you from Bellaire, MI. Population 1,064 or round about. Land of wine, cherries, apples, and the lushest evergreens you’ll ever see. I’m going to count on people NOT knowing this place and tell you it’s a quaint village near Torch Lake. I’m actually visiting some dear friends who moved here from Tennessee a year ago. They’ve always told me about, shown me pictures of Torch Lake, but it’s really something you have to see for yourself. There’re pics on the image slider and my Instagram feed. And yes, it’s cold but unseasonably warm for the area at the moment.

Anyway, I hope you guys had a great weekend! Take a look at everything that’s happened this week:

Chopped all my hair off!

The Bellaire Rubber Duck Parade

 

These rubber ducks will be dumped in the river. Everyone watches them float to the next bridge. There’s a winner for $500.

Downtown Bellaire Christmas Parade and Soup Cook-Off

The soup is really the draw as there were only five participating floats in the parade. The best part is how close-knit the community is and how they support their local businesses.

Kalkaska Shoe Tree

This reminded me a lot of Seattle’s gum wall. So random, gross, and eerily awesome.

Trout

Kalkaska is also famous for this trout fountain.

Review: Midnight Crossroads by Charlaine Harris

Midnight Crossroads Book Cover Midnight Crossroads
Midnight, Texas
Charlaine Harris
paranormal suspense, paranormal thriller

Welcome to Midnight, Texas, a town with many boarded-up windows and few full-time inhabitants, located at the crossing of Witch Light Road and the Davy highway. It’s a pretty standard dried-up western town.

There’s a pawnshop with three residents. One is seen only at night. There’s a diner, but people stopping there tend not to linger. There’s a newcomer, Manfred Bernardo, who just wants to work hard and blend in. But Manfred has secrets of his own...

A review of Midnight Texas by Charlaine Harris. Despite being a longtime fan of Charlaine Harris, I didn’t become interested…

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Review: The Butchering Art by Lindsey Fitzharris

The Butchering Art Book Cover The Butchering Art
Lindsey Fitzharris
Medical History
October 17, 2017

"Warning: She spares no detail!" —Erik Larson, bestselling author of Dead Wake
A Top 10 Science Book of Fall 2017, Publishers Weekly
"Fascinating and shocking." —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

The gripping story of how Joseph Lister’s antiseptic method changed medicine forever.

In The Butchering Art, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery on the eve of profound transformation. She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, working before anesthesia, who were lauded for their speed and brute strength. These medical pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than their patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the deadly riddle and change the course of history.

Fitzharris dramatically recounts Lister’s discoveries in gripping detail, culminating in his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection—and could be countered by antiseptics. Focusing on the tumultuous period from 1850 to 1875, she introduces us to Lister and his contemporaries—some of them brilliant, some outright criminal—and takes us through the grimy medical schools and dreary hospitals where they learned their art, the deadhouses where they studied anatomy, and the graveyards they occasionally ransacked for cadavers.

Eerie and illuminating, The Butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world.

The gripping story of how Joseph Lister’s antiseptic method changed medicine forever.

In The Butchering Art, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery on the eve of profound transformation. She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, working before anesthesia, who were lauded for their speed and brute strength. These medical pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than their patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the deadly riddle and change the course of history.

Fitzharris dramatically recounts Lister’s discoveries in gripping detail, culminating in his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection—and could be countered by antiseptics. Focusing on the tumultuous period from 1850 to 1875, she introduces us to Lister and his contemporaries—some of them brilliant, some outright criminal—and takes us through the grimy medical schools and dreary hospitals where they learned their art, the deadhouses where they studied anatomy, and the graveyards they occasionally ransacked for cadavers.

Eerie and illuminating, The Butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world.

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Friday Free For All: My Favorite Zombie Series

Kathy Geiser writes a list of her favorite zombies novel series and why for Friday Free For All. I’ve always loved apocalyptic books, movies and TV shows

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